• Derived from: coconut
  • Pronunciation: (\ˈkō-(ˌ)kō\ \ˈglü-kə-ˌsīd\)
  • Type: Naturally-derived

What Is Coco glucoside?

Coco glucoside is a cloudy liquid derived from coconut.[1] Coconuts grow on the cocos nucifera, or coconut palm tree. Coconut palms grow around the world in lowland tropical and subtropical areas where annual precipitation is low.[2,3] Widely cultivated, healthy coconut palms produce 50 nuts per year, and the tree can be used to produce everything from food and drink to fibers, building materials, and natural ingredients.[4,5] Coco glucoside is a type of alkyl glucoside, which is formed by mixing alcohols and sugar or glucose.[6]

What Does Coco glucoside Do in Our products?

Coco glucoside is a surfactant, meaning it breaks surface tension in liquids, allowing things to become clean. It can be found in hundreds of personal care products, including shampoo, facial cleansers, body wash, sunscreen, hand soap, makeup, and a variety of other products.[7]

Why Puracy Uses Coco glucoside

We use coco glucoside as a surfactant and cleanser. The Cosmetics Ingredient Review has deemed the ingredient safe for use in cosmetic products, and the EPA has also deemed aggregate exposure unharmful.[11,12] Whole Foods has deemed the ingredient acceptable in its body care quality standards.[13] Also, research shows the ingredient is typically not a skin irritant.[14]

How Coco glucoside Is Made

Commercial production of coco glucoside and other alkyl polyglucosides generally starts by mixing coconut alcohol with some kind of sugar, glucose, or glucose polymer under acidic conditions.[8,9] Alkyl glucoside production first began in 1893 by reacting glucose with anhydrous ethanol to produce ethyl glucoside.[10]

Certifications

Sources

[1] Personal Care Council
[2] University of Florida IFAS Extension
[3] Cosmeticsinfo.org
[4] University of Hawaii at Manoa College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources
[5] U.S. National Plant Germplasm System
[6] Cosmetic Ingredient Review
[7] Environmental Working Group
[8] Cosmetic Ingredient Review
[9] Ash, M., Ash, I. Handbook of Green Chemicals (2004) Synapse Info Resources 
[10] Cosmeticsinfo.org
[11] Cosmetic Ingredient Review
[12] Environmental Protection Agency
[13] Whole Foods Market
[14] Mehling A., Kleber M., and Hensen H. “Comparative studies on the ocular and dermal irritation potential of surfactants.” Food and Chemical Toxicology. 2007;45:747-758

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