• Derived from: coconut
  • Pronunciation: (\stē-ˌar-ik\ˈa-səd\)
  • Type: Naturally-derived

What Is Stearic acid?

Stearic acid is a fatty acid that occurs naturally in animal and plant fats (typically coconut or palm oil).[1] It is a white solid, often crystalline, with a mild odor.[2] It’s a major component of cocoa and shea butter.[3]

What Does Stearic acid Do in Our products?

Stearic acid is an emulsifier, emollient and lubricant. Accordingly, it can help keep products from separating and it can soften skin.[4] It floats on water.[5] Stearic acid is in hundreds of personal care products, including moisturizer, sunscreen, makeup, soap, baby lotion and dozens of other items.[6] It is also used in adhesives, lubricants, laundry products and paper products.[7] Research shows that the ingredient may help burns heal.[8]

Why Puracy Uses Stearic acid

We use stearic acid in several of our products as a moisturizer. Whole Foods has deemed the ingredient acceptable in its body care quality standards, and studies show the ingredient is not a skin irritant.[12,13,14,15,16,17] The Cosmetics Ingredient Review has deemed stearic acid safe for use in cosmetics.[18] The FDA has also deemed stearic acid Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS).[19,20]

How Stearic acid Is Made

Stearic acid is a fatty acid typically produced by hydrolysis of common animal and vegetable fats and oils, followed by fractionation (distillation or crystallization) of the resulting fatty acids. Pressing methods separate the liquid unsaturated fatty acids from the solid saturated fatty acids. The stearic acid used in cosmetics is usually pressed two or three times, resulting in different concentrations.[9] Cosmetic-grade stearic acids are usually mixtures of fatty acids, depending on how they’re manufactured and where they come from (often they’re combined with palmitic acid).[10] There are several grades of stearic acid available commercially.[11]

Certifications

Sources

[1] American Cleaning Institute
[2] U.S. National Library of Medicine
[3] U.S. National Library of Medicine
[4] Personal Care Council
[5] U.S. National Library of Medicine
[6] Environmental Working Group
[7] U.S. National Library of Medicine
[8] U.S. National Library of Medicine
[9] Personal Care Council
[10] Personal Care Council
[11] U.S. National Library of Medicine
[12] Whole Foods Market
[13] Butcher, E.O. (1951). “The effects of application of various substances in the epidermis of the rat.” Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 16, 88
[14] CTFA. (Aug. 14, 1974). Submission of unpublished data. (3-3-10). Safety evaluation of 2.0 percent Stearic Acid in 01 B/62568-)(6020). Four-week subacute dermal toxicity study in rabbits
[15] CTFA. (Aug. 14, 1974). Submission of unpublished data (3-3-16). Four-week subacute dermal toxicity study in rabbits: 2.0 percent Stearic Acid
[16] CTFA. (July 11, 1980) Submission of unpublished data. (3-3-21). Study project 0135. The safety evaluation of two sun protection products and one facial skin care product. Thirteen-week subchronic dermal toxicity study in albino female rats on 5.0 percent Stearic Acid
[17] CTFA. (Aug. 18, 1982). Submission of unpublished data. (3-3-15). Study project 0191. The safety evaluation of three make-up products: 2.4 percent Stearic Acid in 036/18218-12. Thirteen-week subchronic dermal toxicity study using female albino rats
[18] Personal Care Council
[19] Food and Drug Administration
[20] Food and Drug Administration

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