• Derived from: artichokes
  • Pronunciation: (\ˈsel-yə-ˌlās, -ˌlāz\)
  • Type: Naturally-derived

What Is Cellulase?

Cellulase is a naturally occurring enzyme that breaks down cellulose, which is the main constituent of plant cell walls and vegetable fibers (cellulose is what gives wood its strength, for example). Cellulase is produced by fungi, bacteria, protozoans, plants, and animals.[1,2]

What Does Cellulase Do in Our products?

Cellulase is used in the textile industry, pulp and paper, animal feed, and food industries. Because it helps reduce pilling and greying of fabrics containing soil, cellulase is also a common additive in laundry detergents and cleaners.[3] Cellulase is key to turning cellulose into a renewable energy resource.[4]

Why Puracy Uses Cellulase

We use cellulase as an alternative to bleach. The FDA has deemed the ingredient generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for use in food when derived from Aspergillus niger.[9] Whole Foods has deemed the ingredient acceptable in its body care and cleaning product quality standards.[10,11,12] Studies show cellulase is generally not irritating or sensitizing to the skin.[13,14]

How Cellulase Is Made

Cellulase is produced inside fungal cells and then secreted.[5] Commercial production of cellulase thus generally involves fermenting various microbes — typically Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger.[6] After the fermentation is complete, the cells are separated from the fermentation broth, and the soluble enzyme is concentrated and sold.[7,8]

Certifications

Sources

[1]Zhang, X., Zhang, Y. "Cellulases: Characteristics, Sources, Production, and Applications."
[2] Frostburg State University
[3] U.S. National Library of Medicine
[4] Food and Agriculture Association of the United Nations
[5] Schell, D., et al. "Whole Broth Cellulase Production for Use in Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation." Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (1990) 24/25, 287-297
[6] Zhang, X., Zhang, Y. "Cellulases: Characteristics, Sources, Production, and Applications."
[7] Zhang, X., Zhang, Y. "Cellulases: Characteristics, Sources, Production, and Applications."
[8] Schell, D., et al. "Whole Broth Cellulase Production for Use in Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation." Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (1990) 24/25, 287-297
[9] Food and Drug Administration
[10] 
Whole Foods Market
[11] Whole Foods Market
[12] Bannan, E.A., Griffith, J.F., Nusair, T.L. 1992. Skin testing of laundered fabrics in the dermal safety assessment of enzymecontaining detergents. Journal of Toxicology—Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology 11 (4): 327–339.
[13] Griffith, J.F., Weaver, J.E., Whitehouse, H.S., Poole, R.L., Newmann, E.A., and Nixon, G.A. 1969. Safety evaluation of enzyme detergents: Oral and cutaneous toxicity, irritancy and skin sensitization studies. Food and Cosmetic Toxicology 7: 581–593
[14] Rodriguez, C., Calvin, G., Lally, C., and LaChapelle, J.M. 1994. Skin effects associated with wearing fabrics washed with commercial laundry detergents. Journal of Toxicology—Cutaneous & Ocular Toxicology 13(1): 39–45.

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