• Derived from: pink salt
  • Pronunciation: (\ˌhi-mə-ˈlā-ən\)
  • Type: Natural

What Is Himalayan pink sea salt?

Himalayan pink sea salt is an edible salt that comes primarily from the Khewra Salt Mines in Pakistan, near the Himalayas.[1] It comes from ancient sea salt deposits.[2,3]

What Does Himalayan pink sea salt Do in Our products?

Himalayan pink sea salt is a thickener in some of our products. The thickening principle, nicknamed “the salt curve,” states that adding intermediate levels of salt to a surfactant solution makes the solution more viscous.[4] Oversalting the solution makes the solution runnier, however.[5]

Why Puracy Uses Himalayan pink sea salt

We use Himalayan pink sea salt as a thickener and a mineral enhancer. It prevents soap and other cleaning products from dissolving and washing away too quickly. This means customers don’t need to use as much of the product, and the product they do use “feels” more like it’s working.[8] Himalayan pink sea salt is also a good exfoliator for the skin, can help treat acne, and is a good alternative to liquid salt, which has fewer mineral benefits.[9,10] Whole Foods has deemed the ingredient acceptable in its body care quality standards.[11] The FDA has also deemed salt generally recognized as safe (GRAS).[12]

How Himalayan pink sea salt Is Made

Sea salt is produced when water evaporates from the ocean or saltwater lakes. The evaporation process also leaves minerals and other elements behind, which add flavor and color to the salt. Himalayan pink sea salt is thus mined from the earth. Because it is often stone ground, Himalayan pink sea salt is generally much less processed than normal table salt.[6,7]

Certifications

Sources

[1] National Public Radio
[2] Livestrong.com
[3] Mayo Clinic
[4] Penfield, K. "A Look Behind the Salt Curve: An Examination of Thickening Mechanisms in Shampoo Formulations." The XV International Congress on Rheology: The Society of Rheology 80th Annual Meeting
[5] U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Pham, Q. et al., "Process for lowering level of salt required for dilution thickening" 
[6] Mayo Clinic
[7] University of Hawaii
[8] U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Pham, Q. et al., "Process for lowering level of salt required for dilution thickening" 
[9] Livestrong.com
[10] OneGreenPlanet.org
[11]  Whole Foods Market
[12] Food and Drug Administration

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